These stunning images of the human brain reveal an intricate neurological network

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Scientists at the University of Edinburgh are showcasing a stunning series of images depicting the various structures of the human brain. Their goal is to advance research on the inner workings of the brain to help treat and understand a variety of neurological disorders.

This image features a section of the brain no more than 1/20 of a millimeter. The white colored cells are called oligodendrocyte, and the green shaded cells are called astrocytes.

This image features a section of the brain no more than 1/20 of a millimeter. The white colored cells are called oligodendrocyte, and the green shaded cells are called astrocytes.

These star-shaped cells are called astrocytes, which help the brain optimize an environment for electrical and chemical communication.

These star-shaped cells are called astrocytes, which help the brain optimize an environment for electrical and chemical communication.

This is a part of the brain called the hippocambus, which is responsible for coordinating information related to short-term memory,  long-term memory, and spatial navigation.

This is a part of the brain called the hippocambus, which is responsible for coordinating information related to short-term memory, long-term memory, and spatial navigation.

These two images contrast the brain signals of a normal functioning brain (left) to an abnormal functioning brain (right)

These two images contrast the brain signals of a normal functioning brain (left) to an abnormal functioning brain (right).

These electrical connections between cells are not unlike the electrical wires that connect various devices.

These electrical connections between cells are not unlike the electrical wires that connect various devices.

Colored in red are axons the brain uses to transmit information over long distances.

Colored in red are axons the brain uses to transmit information over long distances.

Neurons receive information through tiny, branch-like structures called dendrites.

Neurons receive information through tiny, branch-like structures called dendrites.

Image credits: University of Edinburgh

 

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Kristian strives to enlighten and entertain readers. In addition to his teaching and editorial responsibilities, he is working on a science-fiction novel that promises not to include exoskeleton suits and anemic aliens floating in mysterious vats of green-tinted goop.

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